gardening spirit

As this is the start of National Gardening Week it seems appropriate that I reflect on how important gardening is to me. Growing up in a gardening family, with a self-sufficient attitude to growing vegetables I suppose it was inevitable that one day I’d have a garden of my own to tend. For years I’d visit mum and be walked around the garden having updates on the state of things, nodding but never knowing the names of things, but seeing the pleasure the process of gardening gives to her. Now I understand.

Here in Birmingham we have an allotment to grow the vegetables and fruit in, and we grow flowers in our garden. We have spent over a decade digging and harvesting plot 8; learning to respect weeds for their various ways of making their presence known – I still want to try weaving couch grass. The feeling of success when we pick the first strawberries of the year, or fill the rucksack with runner beans that can be filling the freezer for wintertime is certainly worth the hours of graft. Last weekend I picked over a kilo of purple sprouting, and we commented that the harvest would probably cost well over £10 in the shops, as organic produce – but with no plastic wrapping or air miles included. Of course our food tastes so much better too! Gardening spells out the seasons as we check for frosts, or pick the first fruits, and enjoy the harvest and flowers of each changing month. The beds of wallflowers make me so happy this time each year, signalling the excitement of the growing year getting underway.

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It was at the allotment plot that I first developed my pattern collection ‘Plot to Plate‘, launched in 2012. I had been drawing the allotment beds on the site, as well as National Trust kitchen gardens for a while, and a language of graphic pattern made from lino cuts evolved, firstly as limited edition prints, and secondly as motifs to explore repeat pattern with (for example: Plot to Plate VVV textile design – final image with the Auricula). The title design is slightly different in the fact that it was hand drawn, and is an over-sized dog tooth check featuring tools of growing, cooking and eating, such as garden rakes, spades, whisks, wooden spoons and cutlery as a visual narrative up the tea towel, celebrating the journey from plot to plate – available in Brassica green or Brassica purple. plottoplate_ttowels_katefarley150

This collection has evolved to incorporate more formal pattern compositions such as Parterre (below) and Hanbury, inspired by National Trust’s Hanbury Hall and Gardens in Worcestershire, featured on hand screen printed cushions and wallpaper, where I make links between pattern design for textiles and formal garden design.

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These days my design practice has moved away from the inspiration of the formal gardens but I continue to dig. Our potatoes are in the ground for this year and the greenhouse is working some magic. Gardening provides me with not only creative inspiration but also head-space – a highly valuable asset in today’s world. As a designer and an academic, juggling a young family too, things can be frantic and I’m often running for trains. Faced with two hours of hard clay to dig I’m actually very happy. I can focus on the job in hand while chatting to the friendly robins, making myself physically tired, seeing the result of the work, and at the same time having time to think and mull over some of the other stuff of life. There’s also the sense of community with other allotmenteers; we share the same weather and battles but also share the excess harvests. Every time we get to the point of questioning ourselves about the allotment and if we have time, I remember all that it does for me, how my hard work there actually keeps me well; gives me a sense of well-being I can’t imagine getting from anything else. I shall keep digging, and knowing, for so many reasons, why I do!  Happy National Gardening Week!

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pebble pattern collection

I know I’m not alone in having collections of stones, gathered from walks and adventures over the years. Heads down across the beach, we search for beauty in the lines, colours and patterns of pebbles. We look for skimmers, ones with holes, and stripy ones…

I was looking at some of the stones that are in my studio and realised I had the components of a traditional textile design collection. The key pattern structures often include an all-over design, a spot repeat, a stripe and a plain (from left to right in the image below). I had fun sorting the stones to find the most straightforward ‘collection’.

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whites in paint

Having enjoyed putting the red palette together I have made a more neutral one using the white end of the Farrow & Ball paint chart and a number of ‘finds’ I have in the studio, reminding me of happy times away from the city. The subtlety of the shades and hues of white are beautiful. The textures of the grasses and feathers work really well with the paint and paper qualities too.

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seeing red

My world is pretty colourful; on a daily basis I’m in contact with colourful textures, materials and surfaces from fashion, interior and architectural contexts. Not only do I work with hard and soft surfaces in my design practice, I also teach undergraduates to work with colour in relation to textile design. It’s important to see beyond the broad definition of colour by name and to think about the context of colour; the surface qualities in that colour, the effect the material has on colour, such as gloss, matt and opaque for example.

Last week I managed to update some colour charts in my studio resources and it made me think about how we tend to have particular favourites when it comes to colour. I certainly have a comfort zone in sections of the colour charts and other areas I’d have to be persuaded to go near. Commissions often include discussions with clients about the intended colours of products, and I enjoy the challenges of pushing the boundaries of my comfort zone – within reason! I have a different palette I’m happy to wear compared with what I’d live with, and I certainly dress in colour relating to the mood. I remember many years ago dressing in very colourful clothes only to receive a rejection for something that mattered. I felt gutted I’d dressed for the wrong outcome!

Here are some REDs… I love the border colours between red and orange.

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posted pattern

As those nearest to me know too well I am something of a collector, and regular readers of this blog will have been rewarded for their time, by being lucky enough to read of some of those precious collections.

As printed pattern is my thing it’s not a surprise this collection is all about pattern, but I also have a thing for post, and stationery, and graphic / lined paper, so this collection is really a celebration of many things.

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So when did it become a collection? I remember collecting – I’m not so keen on the word hoarding! – when I was an undergrad textile design student as I made lots of collages using the inside of envelopes as visual noise. I also read something about Matisse saying that drawn and printed patterns were rhythms, as if textures in his work – I think in relation to his Jazz collages, and I completely agreed, sat there on the college library floor making sense of what I had been doing in my sketchbook and being excited at the verification. I worked for Royal Mail in the sorting office in both Norwich and Leeds during my college holidays and I was fascinated by the thousands of envelopes I saw each night shift, making their way across the world, from the sorting frames we sat at. I still have a fairly impressive memory for postcodes as a result of this time twenty years ago! I also realised at that time that if you didn’t pay your BT bill on time they sent the red reminder, and that envelope had the same criss-cross pattern but printed in red – I have a few of those. So this collection started two decades ago!

What is it about the envelope insides? I like the idea that the feature is hidden; a discreet treasure tucked away rather like an exciting lining in a suit pocket. Some of these patterns are busy performing a task that may go unnoticed. Particularly with pay-slips with number-related graphic rhythms, the patterns act in a similar way to patterns of the dazzle ships: distorting, obstructing or distracting from reality.

The inside of envelopes are not the most popular context designers dream of but despite the inconspicuous nature of the envelope interior, even if it’s lucky enough to have a window, I like the fact that someone somewhere was commissioned to design a pattern for the humble envelope. Some of the patterns are fabulous examples of micro prints and I can be partial to those tightly repeating and often graphic rhythms. The colours are rather limited to blue, a rather institutional hue, but there are greys, greens and of course the red of the debt reminder.

Having moved boxes of this archive around the country to various addresses I have lived at I formalised the collection in to sections in lever-arch files, including variations of colour and scale, with another box I’m prepared to sacrifice to collage. Over the last few years, and with a clearer idea of what design, and specifically pattern interests me I’m really proud of the collection. Brick patterns feature, as well as checks, the ones with numbers and the few flowing, more organic ones. Some feature company logos, there are envelope graphics and the beautiful and no-messing dots. Some people still send me ones to add to the collection, and I do still keep an eye out, but sadly there are fewer new ones being added. These days I can appreciate a beautiful pattern but if I have some already (note: obviously I need more than one sample of each!) I can even get them in to the recycling bag! … only to be discovered by the next generation of collage makers in the family, and it comes back out as treasure to someone else. Oh well!

If you want to see more, or share your envelope treasures head to instagram and use #envelopeinsides

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blue

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Horsey, Norfolk.

December 2016

a fine line

Once again, and not a surprise, a trip back to my homeland of Norfolk this Christmas resulted in me taking many photos of the beautiful horizon lines, across fields, marshes, the broads and beach.  Stunning light resulted in ever-changing colours that really showed the landscape off at its best.

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