Plot to Plate season

Apparently it’s National Allotment Week, but having an allotment is an all year round commitment. It is however this time of year when the winter trips to dig the heavy clay soil ready for the Easter planting pays off, and all the trips returning home with only muddy boots to show are forgotten.

We are having to visit the plot at least twice a week to stay on track with harvesting. The currants and gooseberries are picked, eaten or frozen. Strawberries are only a memory along with Wimbledon, but potatoes continue to be dug. We’ve had too many courgettes for what feels like months, but probably only weeks, we’re coming to the end of French beans, but have the runner beans in full flow.  Raspberries have given us the summer stint, and now, along with the blackberries show us signs we are in late summer, heading for Autumn. I’ve already cooked too batches of blackberry jam, and cream teas are regular occurrences at home!

KateFarley_plottoplate_scone_blog

It’s not all going smoothly! We are having no luck with getting parsnips growing; I fear winter roasts without them! The brassicas are being harvested by slugs and butternut squash had better get a move on if they are to deliver ahead of the frosts. Domination of certain weeds make it difficult but I’m determined not to be beaten – we garden organically but there are times I dream of chemicals! We’ve also realised that although growing purple potatoes (Blue Danube) is rather novel, it’s very odd eating purple mash potato and we are not so sure we like it.

KateFarley_bluedanubepotatoblog

Five years ago I launched my Plot to Plate collection which is a celebration of home-grown food. It is a collection that shares my interests of gardening and pattern design, with products on interior and gift products. Limited edition prints initially investigated the motifs used in the repeat designs. You can read more about the Plot to Plate collection development here.

Having an allotment is a great way of being in touch with the seasons and being in tune with nature. I once heard the chap on the next plot to ours exasperated as weeds covered his once tidy plot that he had left alone for a few weeks. He said he was not going to be bossed about by nature… he quit within the season! I sometimes feel that it’s an extra burden in my busy schedule, but once I’m there, digging or harvesting, those thoughts are put aside. The community of the allotment holders is also great. Today I was discussing our successes and failures, and soon the offer of spare brassicas was made and sweetcorn varieties were being recommended. I’ve written before about the good feeling of sharing allotment produce excess before.

KateFarley_Plottoplate_ttowels_blog

My Plot to Plate collection has grown since 2012, far beyond my original intentions, but I’m really pleased with the evolution. I’ve made drawings of many kitchen gardens over the years – National Trust’s Upton House & Gardens remains one of my favourites, along with Hanbury Hall. My tea towels that celebrate the journey from plot to plate with drawings of the tools involved has inspired lots of my design work since then too, so they make me proud.

So here we are celebrating the allotment, but it won’t be just for this week, it’s a collaboration with nature after all and I’m in for the long haul… happy harvesting!

KateFarley_runnerbeansky_blog

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s