posted pattern

As those nearest to me know too well I am something of a collector, and regular readers of this blog will have been rewarded for their time, by being lucky enough to read of some of those precious collections.

As printed pattern is my thing it’s not a surprise this collection is all about pattern, but I also have a thing for post, and stationery, and graphic / lined paper, so this collection is really a celebration of many things.

kfarley_envelopeinsides1

So when did it become a collection? I remember collecting – I’m not so keen on the word hoarding! – when I was an undergrad textile design student as I made lots of collages using the inside of envelopes as visual noise. I also read something about Matisse saying that drawn and printed patterns were rhythms, as if textures in his work – I think in relation to his Jazz collages, and I completely agreed, sat there on the college library floor making sense of what I had been doing in my sketchbook and being excited at the verification. I worked for Royal Mail in the sorting office in both Norwich and Leeds during my college holidays and I was fascinated by the thousands of envelopes I saw each night shift, making their way across the world, from the sorting frames we sat at. I still have a fairly impressive memory for postcodes as a result of this time twenty years ago! I also realised at that time that if you didn’t pay your BT bill on time they sent the red reminder, and that envelope had the same criss-cross pattern but printed in red – I have a few of those. So this collection started two decades ago!

What is it about the envelope insides? I like the idea that the feature is hidden; a discreet treasure tucked away rather like an exciting lining in a suit pocket. Some of these patterns are busy performing a task that may go unnoticed. Particularly with pay-slips with number-related graphic rhythms, the patterns act in a similar way to patterns of the dazzle ships: distorting, obstructing or distracting from reality.

The inside of envelopes are not the most popular context designers dream of but despite the inconspicuous nature of the envelope interior, even if it’s lucky enough to have a window, I like the fact that someone somewhere was commissioned to design a pattern for the humble envelope. Some of the patterns are fabulous examples of micro prints and I can be partial to those tightly repeating and often graphic rhythms. The colours are rather limited to blue, a rather institutional hue, but there are greys, greens and of course the red of the debt reminder.

Having moved boxes of this archive around the country to various addresses I have lived at I formalised the collection in to sections in lever-arch files, including variations of colour and scale, with another box I’m prepared to sacrifice to collage. Over the last few years, and with a clearer idea of what design, and specifically pattern interests me I’m really proud of the collection. Brick patterns feature, as well as checks, the ones with numbers and the few flowing, more organic ones. Some feature company logos, there are envelope graphics and the beautiful and no-messing dots. Some people still send me ones to add to the collection, and I do still keep an eye out, but sadly there are fewer new ones being added. These days I can appreciate a beautiful pattern but if I have some already (note: obviously I need more than one sample of each!) I can even get them in to the recycling bag! … only to be discovered by the next generation of collage makers in the family, and it comes back out as treasure to someone else. Oh well!

If you want to see more, or share your envelope treasures head to instagram and use #envelopeinsides

kfarley_envelopeinsides2

 

 

 

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