Letter box spotting

I shared this photograph on instagram earlier this week and thought it appropriate here too. I have lots of collections and I’ve mentioned several on the blog over the last few years. Some are from certain times in my life, this being one of those.

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During the 1990s I was fascinated by the post and all things related. In student holidays I worked in the Royal Mail sorting offices in Leeds & Norwich, sorting and delivering mail, day & night and was even offered a permanent job – but I went back to graduate in design! I still have my uniform belt & badge, I wore number LS394.

Much of this time I was a student and I was attracted to the graphic qualities of the imagery related to the system of handling post too. I loved the labels and sacks and used some of this language in my final major project on my degree course in Printed Textile Design. I also discovered the GPO Len Lye films etc and couldn’t believe money was spent on such avant garde films to encourage people to post early for Christmas. I love the fact I held in my hands people’s exam results, postcards and letters to Father Christmas and helped distribute them across the world. I liked working the nights with huge machinery that I fed with post as it sort. It was a great feeling to be part of the huge system. For my training I and a dozen others were trained to sort post without error and had to sit an exam to prove it, in order to work the shifts – I still remember too many postcodes, and my geography of Britain improved! My interest in everyday design around me was fuelled … and I’m pleased one of my design heroes David Mellor designed a box. I’d love to design a Royal Mail stamp!

I also loved spotting the different post box designs up and down the country and before  knew it I had rather a few! These photographs include locations across Britain, France, Spain, Israel, Denmark, taken by me and loyal / tolerant friends. Some photographs are very poor quality but the prints on Kodak paper are something of my past. I used to wallpaper my student room with new additions as I got them back from the developers. Thanks to all those people who helped – I’m not sure what to do with them now but let me know if you recognise any of the locations! I have more than this image shows but it gives you an idea of the collection. I’m not sure I’ll start collecting these again but it was a nice trip down memory lane to discover them again.

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bespoke pattern for Birmingham BHX

Designing bespoke pattern for clients is something that I have made a key professional design interest. Communicating a sense of place, historic reference or activity as pattern is what I really enjoy and over the years I’ve been on many site-visits to interesting places to learn about what the client would like or definitely not like. This visit was no different. I love the anticipation of finding out more, a new project to get to grips with, and all my design experience to apply to the challenge …

Some of my previous design work was used as a reference for context images by the original architects, proposing my patterns and stating my details – note – never send artwork without your contact details attached! Phone calls were made, samples were sent, bids were accepted and then a call-up. Please come to the airport for a meeting. There’s a tight deadline, a budget, and something the client knows they want. In a nutshell the brief: Celebrate Birmingham’s buildings in a one colour, repeating pattern that works close up in detail and from a distance as a visual rhythm. Buildings need to be identifiable.

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With any project I carry out research, ask the client lots of questions and evolve a design approach subject to the answers to my questions. Production methods, fabricators, material choices, colours, budgets, time-scales and of course client ambition for the project shape the design language and development of the project. I set off to take photographs of central Birmingham and climbed tall landmarks to get good views. I took photographs, made sketches as well as notes. I had some buildings in my mind I knew needed to be included but I also wanted to use others , less iconic ones, as visual rhythms to play with negative and positive shapes across the composition.

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Back in the studio I chose paper cut-outs as a clear graphic way to create the buildings, as I have done for several commissions including for the Barbican and TfL posters. Once the individual buildings were cut out I scanned in the artwork and spent many hours moving everything around in Adobe Illustrator. I was testing rhythms in and out of repeat and shifting scale, proportions and pairings. This can send me back to re-cut something or add new details. To some people those hours of making subtle tweaks and changes wouldn’t even be noticed but to me it’s so important that every inch of the design works the best it can and it can be time-consuming – but it will be worth it. I can’t stress this enough to students embarking on their Final Major Projects at the moment! When you know what scale the final artwork will be produced at you need to check the correct level of detail as working at a computer screen can be very misleading for artwork several metres long!

A concept sheet and initial design piece was sent to the client for approval and at this point I had to label the buildings I’d included. Once approved I was able to continue building the full repeat, adding further buildings, and make test prints with the help of the team at the Window Film Company – who I already have award-winning work with! They really know their stuff and several phone calls later to check small details regarding file specifications and production issues resulted in the excitement of samples to sign off, both by me and the client. A couple more proofs for colour matching and scale of design was checked and then we were good to go. Quality is everything when it as your name on it, and making sure that everything about the design is right BEFORE it gets installed is rather important. Sleepless nights before installation of projects has been known!

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This project originally came my way almost a year ago with some scoping phone calls and emails, and now I’m able to share photographs with you. I’ve had people let me know they’ve seen work that looks like mine at the airport – hoping I hadn’t been copied – but no, this time it is mine! When Birmingham Airport tweeted the pictures last week I was delighted that I can now share images of this project from 2018 – when I was Birmingham-based as it states, and now it feels rather a fine farewell to the place I called home since 2005.

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(onsite pictures – official photographs from Birmingham Airport)

Yes it is by the toilets, yes I have already worked on two commissions for public toilets (Colchester / Dedham many moons ago), and I can’t promise this will be my last!

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weaver extraordinaire: Anni Albers

If you are interested in textiles and haven’t heard about the Anni Albers show now on at Tate Modern in London, then a.) where have you been? and b.) get there fast if you can!

This has been a much anticipated show for me. Having been enjoying many other people’s pictures via Instagram since the exhibition opened I was most excited to get to the show and I’m so glad I did – I went round it several times and breathed in the history I had learned as an art student myself; typewriter patterns from Bauhaus lessons, the infamous diploma piece with sounds absorbing properties in the yarn, and those classic Bauhaus photographs, but there was so much more. Colour, cloth, pattern, rhythms, photographs, works on paper, products … The woven structures and yarns drew everyone in for a closer look – so much so that the alarms kept being set off and the guilty took a sheepish step back! There was a fascinating display of the research of historical textiles from Albers’ own collection that made perfect sense in how she interpreted and worked with the process of weaving.

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Experimental, commercial commissions, religious pieces and jewellery are some of the aspects of this considerable show. As with most well-received shows, the audience conversations themselves were fascinating; lots of discussions about experiences of weaving, hours at the loom as well as working out what she must have done.

It has been the architects, the painters and the product designers, usually men, who have become far more well known from the Bauhaus, including Anni’s husband Josef Albers. The avant-garde German art school’s first director Walter Gropius stated there were equal opportunities for all when it was established in 1919 and yet women were generally encouraged towards the textiles workshop, a place and craft deemed more suitable. Anni never let this distract from her focus despite wanting to be a painter. Her creative output of a lifetime, as edited in this exhibition, goes a long way to demonstrate her will to explore both the context of design and the development of art. She will have no doubt inspired many who have been introduced to her as a result of the show and her legacy will continue to influence far beyond the context of textiles as a craft for women. I came away with many notes and a head filled textile excitement – happy weaving everyone!

Exhibition ends: 27th January 2019

book lovers unite in support!

You may have already heard about the fire that has destroyed a storage unit in Croydon that includes an irreplaceable collection of family photographs and research, as well as a precious collection of prints and books belonging to Joe Pearson of Design for Today. This includes stock of all the books that he has had published including our ‘Gardening with Mr Bawden’ published last May, as well as many other beautiful books.

There has been a gofundme page set up by Alice Pattullo and Joe’s family to raise money to get the collection re-established and the books reprinted. This will be a huge task but there has been an amazing wave of online support in the first 24 hours, and long may it continue.

Joe is fully committed to publishing beautiful books by illustrators, creating special publications that are often intriguing structures and subjects, with more than a hint of mid-century admiration! He is involved with all aspects of the book development and spends hours working to achieve. He researches, discusses design decisions, organises printing etc, and puts in the time folding and constructing books, packing them up, exhibiting at fairs and promoting the designers he collaborates with. He is an absolute joy to work with and I’m so gutted that this has happened. My sadness goes far beyond knowing that my own books are destroyed – as any collector knows, it’s the experience of building a collection, making choices, keeping an eye out and committing to the task. Joe has built a substantial following on social media as he shares his love of printed matter with the wider world and now needs our help to get things up and running again.

Check out his website if you’ve not done so before, and if you are a lover of printed matter and can spare some change do support the fundraising effort to get Design for Today back up in business and collecting again.

You can read about our book collaboration here.

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SALE of original Plot to Plate products

As I’ve had to move my studio I’ve put some products up for sale via social media in time for Christmas. Most of these products have been screen printed and made by me, and were the very first products I launched in the Plot to Plate collection. You can buy 3 items for £20, with free postage to UK addresses. All you need to do is decide which products in the picture you would like, head to https://www.paypal.me/KateFarley to pay the £20 or multiples of, list the letters relating to the items and add your postal address. I’ll notify you if any of the products are out of stock and suggest a replacement as appropriate.

Please note: if you would like to have the items before Christmas please order before midnight on Tuesday 18th December.

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New / old horizons

It’s been a while since I’ve written here, and it’s been a life-changing couple of months. Resigning from my academic role at Birmingham City University and relocating the family to Norfolk was a huge decision for us all, but we are out the other side, living in Norfolk, settling in and enjoying the change of scene. I’ve taken up a new role as Course Leader for both the BA Textile Design course and the BA Fashion course at Norwich University of the Arts, and I’ve received a warm welcome. I’m enjoying spending time back in central Norwich too and the campus is made up of some fabulous buildings, see below.

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I knew the change in environment was going to be for the better but I’d underestimated quite how good it would be. Commuting to work on a bus rattling along the country lanes is a world away from the streets and railway tracks of Birmingham. We are making sure we are out in the landscape as much as possible and visiting new and old places to find our feet including Rockland St. Mary, Ranworth and Winterton. I feel as if I can breathe more deeply, and yes, their will be more photographs of reeds and the drawings may well feature horizontal lines!

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The end of an era at textilesBCU

If you follow me on any other social media channel you will be well aware I had an amazing send-off by my colleagues at BCU last week. After almost thirteen and a half years working on the BA Textile Design course as lecturer / senior lecturer, and for the last two and a half years as course director it is time to move on.

This staff team have been amazing to work with and it was a hard decision to go, but as I’ve written before, there’s more to life than work, and we want a change of scene for our family. I have worked hard to deliver five big lectures in my final three weeks and decided to end with a series of slides to remember (with the final slide copied below) – as well as hand-over the role to colleagues, empty an office and say farewell to dear friends and students. Here are some pictures from the last week.

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I have been overwhelmed by the number of cards and gifts I have been given, some beautifully hand-made or carefully sourced – so thoughtful! I was also delighted to receive a table-top hand loom I had wanted for a few years now – an old 8 shaft Harris loom warped up by the amazing Sheila, and a beautiful chair, with special thanks to Kelly-Marie, Brenda and Kavita as it has printed upholstery featuring quotes from staff and students past and present that brings tears to my eyes as I read the kind comments. There is also an assessment sheet on the back of the chair – a tradition I started many years ago as I presented staff with their own as they left, so indeed it was my turn – I passed!

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My final day was marked by a third year send-off I could not have predicted – a parachute ride for a textile mini-me from the third floor in Parkside. What precious memories! I send a huge thank you to everyone who helped make this a celebration and who have shared their appreciation of my efforts over my time at BCU. It’s a small world and I know I will cross paths with these wonderful people again!

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